Grant and lee meet at appomattox

The Meeting - Appomattox Court House National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service)

grant and lee meet at appomattox

The Battle of Appomattox Court House (Virginia, U.S.), fought on the morning of April 9, , . At a.m., Lee rode out to meet Grant, accompanied by three of his aides. Grant received Lee's first letter on the morning of April 9 as he was. General Grant came and met Lee at the McLean house in Appomattox. On May 5, Confederate President Jefferson Davis held the last meeting of his. Battle of Appomattox Court House · Lee Surrenders to Grant his beleaguered troops, meet Confederate reinforcements in North Carolina and resume fighting.

Surrender[ edit ] Union soldiers at the courthouse in April Well-dressed in his customary uniform, Lee waited for Grant to arrive. Grant, whose headache had ended when he received Lee's note, arrived at the McLean house in a mud-spattered uniform—a government-issue sack coat with trousers tucked into muddy boots, no sidearms, and with only his tarnished shoulder straps showing his rank.

General Lee Surrenders to General Grant at Appomattox Court House

Lee brought the attention back to the issue at hand, and Grant offered the same terms he had before: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th inst. Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate. One copy to be given to an officer designated by me, the other to be retained by such officer or officers as you may designate.

The officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms, artillery and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officer appointed by me to receive them.

This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside. Officers were allowed to keep their sidearms, horses, and personal baggage. Parkera Native American of the Seneca tribeand completed around 4 p. Grant soon visited the Confederate army, and then he and Lee sat on the McLean home's porch and met with visitors such as Longstreet and George Pickett before the two men left for their capitals.

Chamberlain was the Union officer selected to lead the ceremony. In his memoirs entitled The Passing of the Armies, Chamberlain reflected on what he witnessed on April 12,as the Army of Northern Virginia marched in to surrender their arms and their colors: The momentous meaning of this occasion impressed me deeply.

I resolved to mark it by some token of recognition, which could be no other than a salute of arms. Well aware of the responsibility assumed, and of the criticisms that would follow, as the sequel proved, nothing of that kind could move me in the least. The act could be defended, if needful, by the suggestion that such a salute was not to the cause for which the flag of the Confederacy stood, but to its going down before the flag of the Union.

My main reason, however, was one for which I sought no authority nor asked forgiveness.

grant and lee meet at appomattox

Before us in proud humiliation stood the embodiment of manhood: Instructions had been given; and when the head of each division column comes opposite our group, our bugle sounds the signal and instantly our whole line from right to left, regiment by regiment in succession, gives the soldier's salutation, from the "order arms" to the old "carry"—the marching salute. Gordon at the head of the column, riding with heavy spirit and downcast face, catches the sound of shifting arms, looks up, and, taking the meaning, wheels superbly, making with himself and his horse one uplifted figure, with profound salutation as he drops the point of his sword to the boot toe; then facing to his own command, gives word for his successive brigades to pass us with the same position of the manual,—honor answering honor.

On our part not a sound of trumpet more, nor roll of drum; not a cheer, nor word nor whisper of vain-glorying, nor motion of man standing again at the order, but an awed stillness rather, and breath-holding, as if it were the passing of the dead! Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies, pp. Bartlett 's division and that he did not mention any "salute" in his contemporary letters, but only in his memoirs written many decades later when most other eyewitnesses had already died.

This reference does not include the 7, who were captured at Sailor's Creek three days earlier, who were treated as prisoners of war. Panoramic image of the reconstructed parlor of the McLean House. Grant sat at the simple wooden table on the right, while Robert E. To be frank, I do not think the emergency has arisen to call for the surrender of this army, but, as the restoration of peace should be the sole object of all, I desired to know whether your proposals would lead to that end.

I cannot, therefore, meet you with a view to surrender the Army of Northern Virginia; but as far as your proposal may affect the Confederate States forces under my command, and tend to the restoration of peace, I should be pleased to meet you at 10 A.

grant and lee meet at appomattox

Your note of yesterday is received. I have not authority to treat on the subject of peace. The meeting proposed for 10 A.

Appomattox | The Civil War | PBS

I will state, however, that I am equally desirous for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they would hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed.

Seriously hoping that all our difficulties may be settled without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself, etc. Grant, Lieutenant-General" Still suffering his headache, General Grant approached the crossroads of Appomattox Court House where he was over taken by a messenger carrying Lee's reply.

I received your note of this morning on the picket-line, whither I had come to meet you and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposal of yesterday with reference to the surrender of this army.

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I now ask an interview, in accordance with the offer contained in your letter of yesterday, for that purpose. Your note of this date is but this moment I am at this writing about four miles west of Walker's Church, and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take place will meet me.

The surrender was signed in the 1st floor room on the left. Meeting at Appomattox The exchange of messages initated the historic meeting in the home of Wilmer McLean. Arriving at the home first, General Lee sat in a large sitting room on the first floor. General Grant arrived shortly and entered the room alone while his staff respectfully waited on the front lawn. After a short period the staff was summoned to the room.

General Horace Porter described the scene: We walked in softly and ranged ourselves quietly about the sides of the room, very much as people enter a sick-chamber when they expect to find the patient dangerously ill.

The contrast between the two commanders was striking, and could not fail to attract marked attention they sat ten feet apart facing each other.

Robert E. Lee surrenders

General Grant, then nearly forty-three years of age, was five feet eight inches in height, with shoulders slightly stooped.

His hair and full beard were a nut-brown, without a trace of gray in them. He had on a single-breasted blouse, made of dark-blue flannel, unbuttoned in front, and showing a waistcoat underneath. He wore an ordinary pair of top-boots, with his trousers inside, and was without spurs.

The boots and portions of his clothes were spattered with mud. He had no sword, and a pair of shoulder-straps was all there was about him to designate his rank. In fact, aside from these, his uniform was that of a private soldier. Lee, on the other hand, was fully six feet in height, and quite erect for one of his age, for he was Grant's senior by sixteen years.

His hair and full beard were silver-gray, and quite thick, except that the hair had become a little thin in the front. He wore a new uniform of Confederate gray, buttoned up to the throat, and at his side he carried a long sword of exceedingly fine workmanship, the hilt studded with jewels.

grant and lee meet at appomattox

His top-boots were comparatively new, and seemed to have on them some ornamental stitching Signing the surrender From a contemporary sketch. Like his uniform, they were singularly clean, and but little travel-stained. On the boots were handsome spurs, with large rowels.

A felt hat, which in color matched pretty closely that of his uniform, and a pair of long buckskin gauntlets lay beside him on the table. General Grant began the conversation by saying 'I met you once before, General Lee, while we were serving in Mexico, when you came over from General Scott's headquarters to visit Garland's brigade, to which I then belonged. I have always remembered your appearance, and I think I should have recognized you anywhere.